Tim’s Tips Times Two

This posting could easily be called “A Tale of Two Tim’s” … that’s because we have TWO Tim experts to lean on right now!

Tim Gentry, the vice president of technical services at DaVinci Roofscapes has more than 30 years experience with roofing. Tim Carter, founder of AsktheBuilder.com, also has roofing experience — including his first installation this year of a DaVinci polymer slate roof on his own home!

With this much expertise around, we asked both Tims for installation tips to share with you.

Tips from Tim Gentry:

1. Valley Cuts: Avoid wasteful tile cuts for valleys by finding the correct angle and then cutting your polymer tiles with a circular saw. Then use all the accurate valley cuts and use the leftovers to finish the hips.

2. Nail It: DaVinci steep slope roofing tiles can be nailed with copper, stainless steel, or hot-dipped galvanized nails during installation. The reason for this recommendation is that we expect our synthetic roofing tiles to last for a very long time (especially since we have a lifetime roof warranty!) and we don’t want the fasteners to rust, become ineffective, and be the mode of failure of the Class A Fired Rated roofing system.

3. Rake Tile: Try using a rake tile on gable ends when installing Bellaforté Shake products. It makes these luxury roof tiles easier to install because you don’t need to be too concerned with how precise your cuts are on the gable end — the rake tile covers up all the cuts.

Tips from Tim Carter:

1. Starter Course Overhang: Unless you are using an overhanging drip edge, I recommend installers create a 5/8-inch overhang of the starter shingles past the edge of the metal drip edge. Capillary attraction is a real force of nature and it will suck water up under starter shingles to any unprotected wood decking.

2. Drill Holes for Hip and Ridge: To prevent depressions when cap shingles lay on top of compressible ridge ventilation products, it’s a “best practice” to drill holes in the cap shingles for the nails. Make the hole just ever so larger than the shaft of the nail. The nail will not pull the shingle down as it’s nailed. And remember, don’t overdrive the nails!

3. Snap Lines Every Other Course: Resist the temptation to chalk course lines every five feet or so. Take the few extra minutes to chalk them every other course. This way each course has perfect alignment.

 

 

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